Bernaise Sauce

Bernaise Sauce

Bernaise Sauce

My thoughts this morning transported me to a wonderful steak with bernaise sauce I had at Galveston’s Wentletrap Restaurant some years back.  For those that don’t know, a wentletrap is a beautiful seashell.  $_35This restaurant sure was a great place for fine dining.  I love bernaise sauce so much, I serve it on top of scrambled eggs occasionally.  Yes, I know that may be odd, but it really is quite good!     Bernaise is actually just Hollandaise sauce with a tarragon-vinegar twist.  This sauce is Induction friendly, albeit a bit fat/calorie pricey.  :)  This recipe makes enough for 4 servings of eggs, or atop a bowl of fresh asparagus or a delicious grilled steak.  If any is leftover, I just cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate up to two days.  It’s great on grilled beef, fish and chicken!  It will keep a couple of days in the refrigerator.  To reuse, just melt 1-2 T. butter in a pan and slowly add in the leftover Bernaise a spoonful at a time. Voilà, it’s reborn!🙂

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¼ c. red or white wine vinegar

1 T. green onion (or shallot), chopped

¼ tsp. dried tarragon (or 1 tsp. fresh, chopped)

3 egg yolks

1 tsp. lemon juice

1 stick butter, unsalted (4 oz.)

DIRECTIONS:   This sauce goes together pretty fast, so you really have your steaks about ready before you begin.  Now for the sauce, add vinegar, green onion and tarragon to a small saucepan and over medium heat, bring to boil, lower heat and simmer to allow it to reduce to about 1-2 T.  In another  non-stick skillet over med-low heat, whisk the egg yolks with the splash (1 tsp) lemon juice and 1-2 T. of the butter until smooth.  Whisking continuously, add the rest of the butter in small pats, whisking between each pat as it melts.  When all butter is melted and smoothly incorporated, add the tarragon-vinegar mixture to the Hollandaise egg-butter mixture and stir well.  Serve at once in whatever recipe you are using this for.  If you like a thinner Bernaise, just add more melted butter and adjust the nutritional info to reflect that addition. 🙂

NUTRITIONAL INFO:  Makes  about 1 cup, or 4 servings of  ¼ c. each.   A fourth of the recipe contains:

248 calories

26.3 g  g  fat

0.83 g  carbs, 0.1 g  fiber, 0.73 g NET CARBS

2.35 g  protein

11 mg. sodium

2 comments on “Bernaise Sauce

  1. Peggy, I finally bought some tarragon leaves! You are making a cook out of me.🙂

    My husband & I LOVED this sauce tonight over chicken. DELICIOUS. I didn’t have any white wine vinegar, so I had to substitute white wine worcestershire sauce! Bernaise with a kick.🙂 Delicious. I did add a bit of cream to dilute it because I figured that the WWW was probably more potent than white wine vinegar?

    Let me know what you think about this crazy substitution! We loved it, but then, we don’t have any idea what bernaise sauce is supposed to taste like.🙂

    Thanks, Peggy…you really inspire me to try new things, because I know I can trust your recipes to be great!


    • Mimi, actually, I have subbed red wine vinegar in this to see how it is. Almost the same taste IMO but “grays down” the sauce a bit, visually. I think the French use white just for color impact, not flavor. You know what culinary perfectionists the French are. 🙂 I suspect your WWW changed this quite a bit and likely overpowered the extremely delicate, arromatic taste of tarragon. But hey, many great new culinary discoveries have come about making such substitutions or by sheer accident! TRULY! I find the tang of Worcestershire a bit strong in most things and rarely use it and only in “drop” amounts even in my shrimp cocktail sauce. But if you guys liked the result, THAT’s what counts!! You keep this up and I’ll make a cook out of you yet! LOL


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