Peggy’s Original Dumplings

dumplins

For those who miss dumplings and noodles, here ya go!  Only took me 4 years to develop these! This one’s for you Dano!  🙂

When you can’t have flour, it’s really really hard to make dumplings that will hold together during cooking. I’ve used almond flour, coconut flour, flax meal and a variety of alternate flours.  You name it and I’ve probably tried that alternate flour to make a dumpling.  This is no easy low-carb feat.  I wanted a similar taste and similar mouth feel as the dumplings I made before my low-carbing days.  All attempts thus far have been mediocre, at best.

Somewhere on the net a year or so ago, on some forum (probably Low Carb Friends, but not sure), someone mentioned they made dumplings with glucomannan powder.  Not being at all familiar with this product, I ordered some from Netrition.com and began to experiment.  Its gel-like, fibrous qualities lend themselves to a dumpling, providing structure and texture.  It is also useful for thickening gravies, sauces and puddings.  I’ve even found a tad of this stuff enhances low-carb cake, cookie and bread baking results, both in volume and texture.  I’d love to give credit to my inspiration on this recipe, but I must admit I failed to write down the name of the person who’s ingenious idea this really was.  But I’m thankful they triggered off some experimentation that has paid off!

If you’re not familiar with glucomannan powder, it comes from the Konjac tuber, and is used to make shirataki noodles seen in Asian menus.   It can be used as a binding agent in some recipes.  It is virtually a zero carb food, in that the fiber content is so high, it virtually negates the few carbs it contains as fiber is indigestible and passes right out of the system with zero blood sugar impact.   Most importantly, glucomannan adds the structure and elasticity needed for dumplings and noodles.  So I began experimenting.

I’m getting more comfortable using this tricky ingredient and have finally come up with a “dumpling” that feels and almost tastes like my dumplings of old.  This will now be my go-to low-carb dumpling recipe.  As you can see in the pic above, they hold together nicely during very gentle simmering (unlike all previous attempts), and the gluc powder also slightly releases in to the broth to thicken it as well!  NICE!

For you “experimenters”  under no circumstances, increase the oat fiber!!  I did once and they came out just awful, hard as a rock plus they did not absorb any flavor from the chicken broth because of the density.  Trust me, you DON’T want to go there!  This balance of ingredients it really pretty special and all attemps to “improve” them have been less impressive.

These were the best low-carb chicken and dumplings I’ve had in 4 years!  My husband gave these dumplings two thumbs up today, and he’s pretty picky.  They don’t have much taste, but pick up the flavor of whatever broth you cook them in.  The carb count for these dumplings is simply amazing!  Guilt free dumplings at last!!  YAAAAAAY!

The recipe posted elsewhere on my site for chicken and dumplings is good, don’t get me wrong.  But you have to bake the rolls separately for that recipe.   With this dumpling recipe, I can stir the ingredients together, drop them into the broth, and the dumplings are simmering immediately!  Much easier!  And you regular readers know I’m really in to EASY cooking.

These made up smaller work nicely in  soups and I have made small, oblong shapes for marvelous gnocchi served in rich cream sauces.  Some more adventurous cooks at Low Carb Friends forums are even using pasta extruders and coming up with all kinds of noodle shapes for this dough!  But I don’t own an extruder and probably wouldn’t go to that much trouble for noodles.  Just being very honest.  I’m a lazy cook. 🙂

These dumplings are not suitable until the grains rung of the Atkins OWL ladder due to the oat fiber, but omitting it is just not an option for good results.   I’m very proud to have developed a dumpling recipe that many who have tried freely admit fills a dumpling/noodle void in their low-carb lifestyles.  🙂

My Lobster Linguine recipe is the first time I tried rolling and cutting it into noodles and the final dish was quite good.

This recipe isn’t 100% gluten-free.  But you’ll find many other tasty and easy to cook recipes in her cookbooks.  Any hostess would be happy to serve any of these recipes to family or guests. Click here for a photo preview of some of those tasty dishes here:  LCAF Cookbook Facebook Page.  Order your 5-volume set TODAY! (also available individually) from Amazon or: here

INGREDIENTS:

3/4 tsp. baking powder

1½ T. glucomannan powder (Konjac powder)

1½ T. oat fiber (For gluten-free version, try substituting oat flour ground from 100% gluten-free oats, but I’m not making any promises that will work.  It SHOULD, however.    Carbs will be only slightly higher.)

1/8 tsp. salt

¼ c. +2 T. water

1 extra large or jumbo egg, beaten

VARIATION:  Add 1-2 T. finely chopped parsley to the dry ingredients

DIRECTIONS:   Beat the egg in a small bowl with a fork.  Add the water and beat until well blended.  On a paper plate or in another bowl, mix the dry ingredients well.  Slowly sprinkle the dry ingredients into the wet, stirring with a fork or whisk.  Switching to a rubber spatula, stir and begin to fold the slowly thickening mixture over and over itself until it is a contiguous batter and eventually turns into a thick, almost dry dough.  I let mine sit by the stove 2-3 minutes.  Then, using a teaspoon, dip 3/4″-1″ dollops of the dough into your palm.  This step is important:  roll them gently in your palms into a ball shape.  I set the balls on my counter or a silicone sheet until all are made.  If you just drop them directly into the broth from the spoon without rolling, they tend to fall apart in the broth during cooking.  Or using your hands, roll the dough into ropes on plastic wrap and cut into short lengths for gnocchi, if that’s your pleasure.

I like to remove chicken, meat or large chunks of vegetables to a platter before putting on the dumplings to cook.  This allows ample room for the dumplings to rise and swell up.Have your soup/broth boiling.  Drop the round dumplings/gnocchi into slowly simmering broth and immediately turn fire medium-low so it will only gently simmer.  This is IMPORTANT, as you don’t want to “rough up” these delicate babies.  Cover with tight lid.  From the time you cover the pot, set timer for exactly 10 minutes for dumplings (8 minutes for smaller gnocchi).   DO NOT LIFT THE LID or disturb the pot during cooking.  After 10 minutes  (8 minutes for gnocchi), lift the lid and VOILA!!  They’re done!  You may have to thicken the stock further depending on your personal preference, but the dumplings themselves usually take care of thickening, as some of the glucomannan in then sloughs off into the broth, thickening it right up.

NUTRITIONAL INFO:  Makes 12 medium-large 1½” dumplings (24 gnocchi), each contains:  (halve the numbers for each gnocchi)

7.17 calories, 0.49 g  fat, 1.38 g  carbs, 1.29 g  fiber, 0.1 g  NET CARBS, 0.61 g  protein, 55 mg sodium

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244 comments on “Peggy’s Original Dumplings

  1. Good for you Peggy. Being a noodle/dumpling.,pasta/starch,matzo ball lover ,
    I shall try them.
    Thanks so much. When I was a lot younger I experimented constantly in my laboratory
    (kitchen) and not so much now. That is why I am so grateful to see you younger
    gals taking over and doing so many fun things with ingredients we can use
    as Low Carber/Keto/what ever your diet is.

    • Hi, Barbo! I’m sure not FEELING very young these days. Feeling every year of my 69 years. My back is giving me fits and I can’t stand up for very long to do much cooking in the kitchen anymore. Pain Management docs have got the lumbar area pretty pain free now with nerve ablations once a year. But just as that settles down, the thoracic vertebrae are singing out now. I see my specialist in June for the new pain area. I hope you’re doing OK and still keeping your hand in the cooking. Good low-carb experimental cooks like you are hard to come by these days. 🙂

  2. Gonna pop back in here with another comment, I love these so much. I have had great success rolling these out pretty thin and cutting them into wide noodles for chicken ‘n dumplings, Southern style. (I haven’t had any problems with their being sticky or hard to handle).
    But the great thing is, over on Low Carb Friends, folks started adding a little coconut flour to this dough and putting it through a pasta extruder to make amazing spaghetti, fettuccine, and other noodle shapes. I bought a little handheld extruder from Amazon for about $20 and have had a ball making great noodles with it! Way to go, Peggy–you’ve really got a winner here!

    • I followed that long thread on LCF forums for a long time. Some folks (like Jen Hoberer) were doing some incredible things with the extruder and this recipe. I just got to where I didn’t like to have to watch every single thing I posted to keep the site owners from slapping my hands. That gets old real fast, so I stopped going to LCF much. So glad you’re having fun with this recipe, Diana. Happy extruding to you!

      • I know exactly what you mean! Some of my favorite low carbers have left because of that–I nearly did as well, after having my hand slapped over something very innocent. I still look in once in awhile, though, just to see what’s new. After the PhotoBucket turnover, most of the pictures are gone now, too.

  3. “I like to remove chicken, meat or large chunks of vegetables to a platter while the dumplings are simmering to allow ample room for the dumplings to rise and swell up. DO NOT LIFT THE LID or disturb the pot during cooking….”
    Am I reading this correctly? While they are simmering, but don’t take the lid off?

    Sorry if I’m not reading this correctly, I know you aren’t as dumb as I look!

  4. We tried thus as gnocchi with a butter,garlic, parsley sauce. Wonderful… need to let the cooked pasta live with sauce a while to pick up the flavors but wow… Next try will be another pasta (linguine) or bow noodles and I’m thinking pot stickers… Thank you so much!!

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