Daikon “Hash Browns”

Daikon Hash Browns

Daikon Hash Browns

If you’re missing hashbrowns with your morning eggs, wait no more.  I’ve tried this with grated jicama, but that’s not quite as satisfying.  These made with Daikon or Japanese radish (available in Asian grocery stores) have a closer texture to potatoes than jicama.  I add the onion because my family always added it, and it helps to hide the very mild radish taste.  You mustn’t judge these until you’ve tried them.  They are pretty amazing.  And they are low in carbs.  They are suited to all phases of Atkins, Keto diets, Primal and Paleo.  As seen in the picture below, they can also be made with traditional red radishes.  Both are equally tasty in my opinion.

More delicious low-carb recipes can be at your fingertips with your very own set of Jennifer Eloff and friends’ best-selling cookbooks LOW CARBING AMONG FRIENDS.  She has collaborated with famous low-carb Chef George Stella and several other talented chefs to bring you a wealth of delicious recipes you are going to want to try.  Even a few of my recipes are in her cookbooks! Order your 5-volume set TODAY! (available individually) from Amazon or: http://amongfriends.us/order.php

DISCLAIMER: I do not get paid for this book promotion or for the inclusion of my recipes therein.  I do so merely because they are GREAT cookbooks any low-carb cook would be proud to add to their cookbook collection

Daikon (Japanese) Radish

Daikon (Japanese) Radish


2 c. daikon radish, peeled and cubed

1 T. + 2 tsp. bacon grease

2 oz. onion, chopped (I used purple onion)

Dash salt

Dash pepper

DIRECTIONS:  Melt bacon grease over high heat.  Add onion and saute until it is softened.  Add diced daikon and continue sauteing, stirring often to brown on all sides.  When tender, salt and pepper to taste and serve warm.

NUTRITIONAL INFO:  Makes 2 servings, each contains:

Red Radish Hash Browns

Red Radish Hashbrowns

127 calories

10.8 g  fat

7.0 g  carbs, 2.1 g fiber, 4.9 g  NET CARBS

.9 g  protein

468 mg sodium



14 comments on “Daikon “Hash Browns”

  1. Wowie Kazowie!!!,,,,,just made (and devoured) your hash browns made with daikon. This is right up there with my most favorite low carb recipes. The only thing I did differently was to add a smidge of butter along with the bacon grease and added in sweet red bell pepper in addition to the onion. I cooked for quite awhile until golden brown. I then fried an egg and placed over my hash brown serving. Seriously to die for!


    • I’m so glad you enjoyed these, Barbara. There are so many good hash brown substitutions, I honestly don’t know which I like best, but this one is high on my list, for sure.🙂


  2. I tried the daikon in fried potatoes and hot dogs (“potato” sliced pretty thin, hot dogs sliced 1/4 to 1/2 inch, fry all in pan with butter or oil, eat with ketchup) and it was OK. Tried the hashbrowns and it was a little better, made sure to cook them more. Once I added a couple fried eggs it was much better. Tonight I tried boiling some up for “potato” salad. Not terrible.

    In all 3 tries I still had a clear radish taste. As long as didn’t focus on how potatoes shouldn’t taste that way I more or less enjoyed the dish. If I got it in my head that they should be exactly like potatoes I focused too much on the radish taste. I do better when I don’t try to exactly replace old favorites, and instead enjoy new things.

    I still have some daikon so I will probably try again with some of this stuff – somehow the second time I do things it comes out better even if I don’t intentionally change things.



    • The onion in my hash browns disguises that faint taste of radish. I think the best application is actually in soups and stews. Then the surrounding flavors hides the hint of radish taste so effectively, you really do think it’s potatoes. I do believe the trick to using them as a potato sub is to have at least 1 or 2 other dominant flavors along with them in your dish.🙂


    • I think grating will work. These don’t have cheese in them, but I suppose you could add it. I’ve just never had it in breakfast hash browns. Would make a delicious side veggie with cheese at dinner though. 🙂 Let me know how you like the daikon!


  3. I can’t say I followed this completely like I’d planned when I walked into the kitchen. I used two pieces of leftover bacon and added cheese (similar to your most recent daikon recipe) instead. And it was delicious. My daikon was still a bit more crunchy than potato hashbrowns would have been but it tasted too good to matter. All the flavor and no guilt!

    Thank you for giving me the foundation recipe and idea! I’m excited to finally have a replacement to my family’s cheesy hashbrown casserole recipe. Next time I’ll make this recipe as listed here. I know it will be awesome also.


    • Well just look at creative YOU, Aradyss! Your cheesie browns sound GREAT! I’ve never had them that way, but it sounds rel good! Oh, and that caserole I just posted is REAL good, too. I was amazed how the daikon in that tasted like scalloped potatoes. My husband was even MORE surprised by that. He hates turnip, radish, rutabaga taste PERIOD. But he dipped up seconds last night! 🙂


      • I will be trying that casserole recipe too. I was just out of kale or chard. I think when my in laws come next month. My husband is like yours and not a fan of turnips, radishes, rutabaga etc either!


  4. Ah, how did you know just what kind of recipe I needed?? I just got a 2ft long daikon radish in my co-op this week and hadn’t figured out what I wanted to do with it. We used a couple inches diced up in tuna salad but still had the rest to eat.

    We’ve made hashbrowns with jicama before. We’ll definitely be trying this. Thanks!


Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s